Monday, August 26, 2013

UMJC to Messianic Jews: "Get Rid of the Crosses!"

So I'm curious to hear what you think of this:

My wife and I were talking to a Jewish friend of ours the other day.  She said that a certain former president of the UMJC told her that she shouldn't be wearing a cross.  See, she wears a star of David necklace and, additionally, a cross necklace.

Any thoughts on this guys?  Is the UMJC going too far here?  Or do you all agree with the former president's position that Yeshua-Believing Jews shouldn't wear crosses?


8 comments:

  1. What if Yeshua would have died by an execution squad,Would we will wearing little machine guns on our necks?

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    1. Good point, Dan. I don't really mind, by the way, that Messianic Jews have strong opinions regarding the symbol of the cross. I don't even mind what my wife reported to me--that the congregation of that former president censored the praise and worship songs to exclude all mention of the cross and replace it with terms like "tree." I understand that it can be a painful symbol for some.

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  2. To my knowledge there is nothing wrong with a ceremonial cross, provided that it is not used as in Catholicism, as an image to worship. During the long course of its history, Judaism has been enriched with symbols like the Chanukah menorah and the Magen David, and Haman Tashen. The typical symbol of Yeshua is the cross, and we glory in a crucified Messiah. Messiah did not die on a cross accidentally. His manner of death was part of the divine plan. Crucifixion was a Roman way of execution and when Messiah died on the cross, this cross became his instrument of victory over the Roman Empire — the final of the four Beasts mentioned in the Book of Daniel and the Apocalypse — and thus of his victory over all the wordly powers.

    It is completely proper, in my opinion, to wear a necklace of the cross, or making the sign of the cross at certain moments of the liturgy, e.g. when specific messianic berachoth are recited. Making the sign of the cross is in fact a beautiful confession of the core of our messianic faith. In touching our forehead we symbolize the authority of G-d the Father, in touching our navel we symbolize his only begotten Son, Yeshua the Messiah, and in touching our shoulders we symbolize the power of the Ruach HaKodesh.

    The acceptability of traditions like these should be determined according to the standards of the Torah. Making a crucifix with a corpse on it, with the intention of worshipping the image and offering incense to it, as occurs in the Roman Catholic Church, is clearly unacceptable by Torah standards. But there's no objection to a ceremonial cross without a corpse, hanging on a wall or above an entrance, or decorating a table which is used for celebrating Yeshua's Supper, or engraved in the vessels and cloths used in the Supper.

    We should keep in mind that our messianic confession requires messianic symbols and identity markers as part of our lifestyle and liturgy. Being ashamed of using the symbol of the cross can be an indication of being offended by the crucifixion of Messiah.

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    1. The root of the thing is idolatry IMHO

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  3. Why do you jews get upset over a cross? I am Ukrainian Catholic and wear a cross.. so is it bad???

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  4. I am a non-denominational Christian. I am just finding out about Messianic Judaism and I find it fascinating. My father's side is catholic and I've attended mass numerous times. While some traditions I don't agree with, to me the crucifix is a reminder of the gift/grace G-d has given us. Even with "the corpse". I wear crosses, and crucifixes and seeing the image of what our Savior did for us is a way of maximizing ones appreciation for Him. I take it as symbolism and not once have I witnessed one catholic worship it. I have seen people when they pray appear to look up at it which I assume is what you mean by worship. But I again like to maintain that they aren't praying to the statue, but what the body on the cross represents and I'm sure since He is a "personal G-d" it is easier for all of us to look at something that represents Him while we are talking to Him. No differently than when I have visit a graveyard and look at a tombstone of a deceased loved one and begin to speak. Am I talking to the loved one? Or the stone?

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    1. Welcome. I would like to hear your opinion on the following post:

      http://orthodoxmessianic.blogspot.com/2015/03/the-triple-locked-door-in-basement-of.html

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  5. "but what the body on the cross represents"

    It is important to understand that the "what" is actually a "who"

    That person forbids men to make physical objects to "represent him" (but also to worship the object) The forbidding is both. Forbidden to make, and forbidden to worship with such.

    The reason is that G-d is a spirit and those that worship him must worship him in "spirit and in truth". If you worship him by making/possessing a physical object of mans' construction that "represents him" you are by definition an idolater.


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